The Best Momos in NYC guide image

NYCGuide

The Best Momos in NYC

Where to get steamed, fried, and soupy momos in NYC.

New York City has a robust dumpling scene, and momos, the Himalayan version, are among the most satisfying. Most of the city’s Nepalese and Tibetan dumplings can be found around Jackson Heights, but our list includes a range of places where you can come face-to-face with a steaming plate of doughy dumplings and the obligatory dipping sauces. Besides the steamed and pan-fried standards, you’ll find spicy, soupy jhol momos, smoky tandoori momos, and some that are only-in-NYC—like the taco momo and the momo paratha wrap.

THE SPOTS

Momo Crave imageoverride image
8.2

Momo Crave

$$$$

38-07 69th St, New York
Earn 3X Points

Connoisseurs know why the top spot on our momo guide is a Woodside delivery place that’s best known for its inventive takes on the classic dumpling. If taco momos sound gimmicky, think again, because these deep-fried, black bean and avocado-topped dumplings are really good. So are the sukuti momos, fried in chili sauce with bits of sukuti, a tender beef jerky. But our favorites are the pleasantly smoky tandoori momos, which are served on wooden skewers with peppers and onions. They’re easy to eat while walking down the street, which is convenient because there are only a couple of small tables here. 


photo credit: Noah Devereaux

Phayul review image

Phayul

Earn 3X Points

You shouldn’t ever get just one thing at Phayul, a tiny Tibetan spot in Jackson Heights with a constant stream of people coming in and out. But if you’re alone and not very hungry, order the beef momos. They’re chewy and juicy, with a hint of celery, and if they weren’t so filling, we’d spend most of our money on them. Phayul’s steamed and fried dumplings are both as flawless as lab-created diamonds, so you may find yourself wondering which to order. The correct answer is: get both. 


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The best chili momos we’ve tried are at Mount Everest Deli & Grocery, a convenience store in Ridgewood. Pan-fried with peppers in a sticky, sweet-and-spicy sauce, these are perfect on their own, but they’re even better in the deli’s specialty: a cheesy momo paratha wrap. Yes, this involves dumplings wrapped in bread, and yes, we’re very into it. There’s nowhere to sit among the aisles of South Asian snacks and groceries at Mount Everest, but there are a few park benches across the street where you can take your haul.


At this full-service Nepalese restaurant in Jackson Heights, you can get your momos steamed and soft or fried and crispy, and both are solid choices—but we actually think the best order here is the soupy bowl of jhol momos. The crescent-shaped dumplings come floating in a thick, spicy, tomato and sesame-based broth. We usually go with beef, since its saltiness goes well with the jhol.


There’s only one kind of momo on offer at Zhego, a cozy little Bhutanese restaurant in Woodside, but they do that one style very well. The steamed, round parcels here are filled with cheese and vegetables and pack a ton of flavor. An accompanying chili sauce is the spiciest on this guide, and it all goes very well with a cup of hot, salty butter tea. 


Our top pick for veggie lovers, Amdo Momo is a truck parked at the 7 stop in Jackson Heights. These Tibetan momos have so much flavor you don’t even need sauce—although the hot and white sauces they come with are really good, too. Each batch is steamed to order, so you might have to wait a few minutes, and the wait is worth it. The veggie filling is super crunchy and refreshing, but the chicken and beef are also solid. 


Kathmandu Fusion Kitchen is a good spot for a quiet sit-down meal where you can order round after round of momos, drink tea, and have a long, leisurely catch-up with friends. They make our favorite soupy jhol momos, with a vibrant orange broth and an ideal ratio of filling (we like veggie best) to wrapper. Get at least one thali so you can try a little bit of a lot of different things—we’re fans of the goat version. 


If you’re planning a big momo-eating outing with a group of friends, Bajeko Sekuwa in Sunnyside is your best bet. It’s more of a sit-down spot than some of the other Nepalese restaurants in the area—the kind of place where you could easily have a big group meal or even a birthday dinner. We like all the varieties here, but the smoky, crispy pan-fried momos have our hearts.


One of two momo trucks on this list, Mom’s Momos on Broadway in Jackson Heights makes fried and steamed Tibetan versions with plump, thick exteriors and a choice of vegetable, beef, or chicken filling. Our pick is the fried beef dumpling doused in a combo of spicy, red chili sauce and cooling white sauce. You need both for full effect. Mom’s also has a location off of Queens Boulevard in Sunnyside.


There aren’t a ton of momos in Manhattan, but if you find yourself in the East Village and you simply must have them, go to Lhasa. Cozy and modern with lots of blonde wood and exposed brick, Lhasa feels like the ideal place for a low-key first date. It’s understandably difficult to choose between the options here, so make it easy on yourself and get one of Lhasa’s combos. We particularly like the non-veg combo, which comes with eight lightly crisped dumplings filled with chicken, beef, or beef and chive.


You’ll find notably large, tender, steamed dumplings with a ton of vegetable, chicken, or beef filling at Tawa Roti, a Jackson Heights shop with a few tables that overlook an open kitchen. Watch as your momos are stuffed and folded, then try to be patient while they steam. Make liberal use of the two squeeze bottles of sauce on your table, especially the sesame.


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